Monthly Archives: February 2012

This is Anthony’s blog Check me out!

This is Anthony’s blog Check me out!.

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I love open source

Words

Be it computer science, data, government, science or NASA the importance of open is becoming pervasive. Openness, in all the various fields, implies community effort. A community of people that are passionate about something and open to contribute time and effort to experience a feeling of accomplishment. I’ve been using Linux and open tech for years now and only lately I started thinking about this. It was just something I took for granted, and the problem was, I assumed everyone else knew and understood what I did.

But many people with both technical and non technical background don’t understand or even know how important it is to resist completely closing down to a corporate mindset that is selling, having little transparency and keeping the knowledge “secure” because the competition will beat or steal from ‘us’. This closed tradition is the reason many companies do things that have already been done…

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this is good info about linux bash

Asif's Blog

I always had confusion about login vs non-login shell and today decided to clear this up. Here is what I have understood. Please refer to the following site for more explanation.

Reference: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/view/cvs/postlfs/profile.html

When a user starts The shell program /bin/bash (hereafter referred to as just “the shell”), shell uses a sequence of startup files to create an environment for the user. This includes PATH, PS1, HOME etc. Each file has a specific use and may affect login and interactive environments differently. 

First Some definitions:

Login Shell:

A login shell is one whose first character of argument zero is a -, or one started with the –login option.     It starts after a successful login using /bin/login and by reading the /etc/passwd file.  

Interactive Shell:

An interactive shell is one started without non-option arguments and without the -c option whose standard input and error are both connected to terminals, or…

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