Author Archives: swift110

About swift110

As you can see I love working with various Linux Operating Systems, as well as programs that are Open-Source in nature. Speaking of nature, I love long walks where there is plenty of it.

OMXPlayer

8i

I’ve used omxplayer months ago and got away from it but now I want to try it again until I can figure out how to get vlc to work properly

Code Yarns

The Raspberry Pi is a great device for video playback using its HDMI output. It is popularly used as a HTPC by installing a full-blown media player solution like OSMC (formerly RaspBMC) or OpenELEC. What if you do not want such a heavy-handed solution, but just need the ability to play a video file now and then?

OMXPlayer is a command-line video player written specifically for the capabilities of the Raspberry Pi. It is filled with features and can output to the HDMI of the Pi.

  • SSH into your Raspbian and install it:
  • Make sure your HDMI is forced to turn on at boot, as described here.
  • Shutdown your Pi and your TV. Connect the Pi to the TV using a HDMI cable. Power on the TV first and choose the HDMI input. Next, power on the Pi.

  • SSH to the Pi and play the video file…

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How to cast to Raspberry Pi using Raspicast

I highly recommend this for all you folks with raspberry pis

Code Yarns

Fret not that your friends can cast Youtube videos from their Android device to their TV using Chromecast! You can cast anything from your Android device to your TV if you have a Raspberry Pi connected to it using the awesome Raspicast app!

  • Setup your Pi: You will need a Raspberry Pi with Raspbian installed on it. It is connected to your TV using a HDMI cable. You can SSH to your Pi. Optionally, you have OMXPlayer installed on your Pi and checked that you can play video files using it.
  • Install app: Install the Raspicast app from here.
  • Configure: Provide the IP address of your Pi, its port (usually 22), login (usually pi) and password.
  • Cast away: Play any video in Youtube app on your Android device. Click the Share option and choose Cast (Raspicast). Raspicast opens, wait for a second and…

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Admiring the Springs that Created Tiber Creek

absolutely wonderful. I have seen this for myself but I would love to actually get over there

Park View, D.C.

A little over four years ago, I posted about Tiber Creek and its headwaters rising up on the grounds of the Soldiers’ Home. While Tiber Creek is largely gone to the casual observer, one of the neat things about it is that the Soldiers’ Home’s grounds contain most of the few remaining traces of the Tiber — including the two ponds near the (closed) Park Road Gate, a natural section of the Tiber to the south of the ponds, and a brick lined channel just inside the fence along Rock Creek Church Road between the Randolph and Eagle gates.

s Brick and concrete structure at the northern end of Tiber Creek.

Recently, while walking along the fence and looking at the brick channel, I noticed that there are some brick and concrete structures along the channel. The northern one is just south of Upshur Street, the southern most one is located…

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How to run Blender headless (from the command line, without the GUI)

Wow! what a great idea. I just need to now how to do this in Linux

Caret Dash Caret

Today I decided to roll up my sleeves and figure out how to run Blender headless. I’ve been telling people that it’s possible (based on documentation), but haven’t tried it out myself.

Until now!

It’s actually pretty simple. Here are some steps. I’m on a Mac, so the paths might be slightly different if you’re on another operating system (check out these instructions for for Windows).

1. Figure out the path of the Blender executable. If you’ve ran the Blender console window before, it’s the same executable.

To find it via GUI, open up where the downloaded Blender zip was extracted.

Blender package

On a Mac, show package contents and navigate to the blender executable.

Blender executable

Actual path:

(I currently have the extracted Blender 2.74 package on the Desktop for simplicity so my path reflects that.)

2. Run the executable with the -b argument to run Blender without the GUI. You can…

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Loud Library

So I come to the library today sit down and get onto the internet, a few minutes later and two people decide to come in and immediately they get on their phones.  I immediately think to myself:

Why are you here making all this noise?

I mean seriously, this is just not the place for that.  There are plenty of books that you could read, or even get on one of the public computers if you don’t have one of your own.  There are even areas for you to sit in at a local Safeway but yet you choose to come here and disturb others with this foolishness.

Would it kill you to just sit down and shut up?

Oh, and if i say anything to you about it, then we have the likelihood of confrontation. But it doesn’t have to be that way You could just be mindful of others and take your conversation elsewhere.

Other patrons look and I am sure they feel as I do.  This is also one of those times when none of the librarians will randomly walk in to check on things and correct the problem.

Good, they left.

LOL!! Looks like I spoke too soon.  It’s like that movie “We’re back!” except this isn’t exactly a dinosaurs story.

You know what…..I don’t have to take this…I’m going home.

 

A Memory Comparison of Light Linux Desktops – Part 3

l3net - a layer 3 networking blog

Linux kernel manages all RAM memory in your computer. Unused memory goes into a special buffering pool, where the kernel caches all recently used data. If a process attempts to read a file and the kernel already has the file cached, reading it is as fast as reading RAM.

Filesystem-heavy task, such as compiling source code, processing video files, etc. benefit from as much free memory as possible in buffering pool. It is not uncommon today to see users with powerful systems running tiling window managers in only a few megabytes of memory. Also, with the personal computer market in decline, people tend to keep their computers longer.

In this article I continue the measurements started in part 1 and part 2 of this series.

I use free command to measure memory. It basically prints out values provided by the kernel. Of interest to us is the number on -/+…

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A Memory Comparison of Light Linux Desktops – Part 2

l3net - a layer 3 networking blog

In my previous article I’ve tried to investigate the RAM memory requirements for running some of the most common light window managers and desktop environments available in the Linux world. Prompted by several readers, I’ve decided to include also the big, well-known memory hogs that grab most of the Linux market, i.e. KDE, Unity and Gnome.

I am using the same setup, based on virtenv. It includes its own xserver (Xephyr) and a virtualization container (LXC). The computer is an older 64-bit machine, running Ubuntu 12.04 with LXDE as desktop environment.

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